Hellenic tradition – from Julian to our days

The following article lists the links in the chain that reach into our time, giving the Hellenic tradition a strong fundament for the future. These are the links in a long chain, to which today’s Hellenismos owes its confident self-understanding and self-confident behaviour. This self-understanding wouldn’t exist if others hadn’t ensured that the torch would be passed on to future generations, and that the human chain of re-Hellenization was not completely severed. We ethnic Hellenes owe our identity to this chain, to the many known and unknown links of re-Hellenization, who have made many efforts at their own risk, and great sacrifices in order to preserve and pass on a persecuted cultural tradition. We honor and remember them with deep gratitude.

The list makes no claim to completeness.
The text was sub-divided into the centuries of the Christian era (CE) to facilitate the flow of reading.

julian

4th CENTURY

Flavius Claudius Julianus or Julian the Philosopher (331-363)
Oribasius (325-403)
Maximus of Ephesus (310-372)
Sallustius
Eustathios
Aedesius
Antoninus
Asclepiades the Cynic
Heraclius the Cynic
Nymphidianus of Smyrna
Sopater of Apamea
Priscus of Epirus (305-395)
Libanios (314-393)
Praefectus Paulinus
Hypatia (355-415)
Helladius of Alexandria
Macrobius (390-?)
Sosipatra (300-36?)
Chrysantius of Sardis (310-390)
Themistius (317-388)
Eunapius of Sardis (347-after 414)
Plutarch of Athens (350-432)
Dexippus

5th CENTURY

Nonnus of Panopolis
Joannes Stobaeus
Hierocles of Alexandria
Olympiodorus the Elder
Sallustius of Emesa
Troilus of Constantinople
Syrianus (437)
Isidore of Alexandria (450-526)
Uranius the Aristotelian
Proclus Diadochos (412-485)
Domninus of Larisa
Hermeias of Alexandria
Aedesia
Heliodorus of Alexandria
Hierius
Asklepigenia
Archiadas
Pericles of Lydia
Marinus of Neapolis (440-486)
Zenodotus
Heraiscus
Asklepiades
Ammonios Hermeiou (440/450-after 517)
Pamprepius
Zosimus

6th CENTURY

Hegias
Agapius of Athens
Asklepiodotos of Alexandria
Priscianus Lydus
Damascius (462-538)
Simplicius (480/490-550)
Eulamius
Asclepius of Tralleis
Eutocius
Asclepiodotus of Alexandria
Olympiodorus the Younger
Procopius of Caesarea (500-562)
Referendarius Macedonius
Quaestur Thomas
Pagesius
Praefectus Asclepiodotus
Phocas
Johannes Lydus (490-560)
Priest Rufin
Anatolius
Akindynos

7th-9th CENTURY

Already in the the seventh century, Hellenes of minor Asia fled the cities and settled in remote areas. We do not have any exact name from this period.

10th CENTURY

The resistance of the last free Hellenes in Greece collapses. Mani in southern Laconia falls to the Byzantines. Under the onslaught of Islam, the Hellenic tradition in Carrhae comes to a sudden end.

15th CENTURY

Georgius Gemistus Pletho (1355/1360-1452)
Juvenalios (1380–1451)
Demetrios Raoul Kabakes (1397-1487)
Manilius Marullus
Michael Marullus (1458-1500)

The Hellenic stratioti or stradioti (15th to 18th century)

16th CENTURY

Helysios Kallentzis or Kalentzis

According to Konstantinos Sathas, the active phase of the secret Hellenic «Attic society» of the stratioti

18th CENTURY

Ethnic Hellenic revolution in the context of the short-lived French rule in the Ionian Islands (June 1797 to March 1799).

The Hellenic Jacobins on the Ionian Islands are defeated by the Russo-Ottoman military alliance under the leadership of Admiral Fyodor Ushakov and Kadir Bey. Their main demands were the introduction of democracy and socialism, the abolition of Christianity and the revitalization of Hellenic religion and of the Olympic Games.

19th CENTURY

With the approval of the Ottomans, the British antiquities robber Edward Clarke takes physical possession of the sacred statue of the Demeter cult in the village of Eleusis, near Athens, and thus puts an end to the cult of the goddess in 1801.

Louis Menard (1822-1901)
Nikolaos Politis (1852-1921)

20th CENTURY

Vlassis G. Rassias (1959-2019)
Christos Pandion Panopoulos (born 1977)

First public Hellenic orthopraxy in Greece in 1987 by the ethnic Hellenic league DIIPETES («Sent by Zeus»).

Founding of the first Hellenic magazine «DIIPETES: For the defense of the ancient soul» (1991-2012). The magazine published 100 issues and three books.

Founding of the Hellenic publishing house Anichti Poli («Open city»).

Merging of several Hellenic collectives into the Supreme Council of Ethnic Hellenes (YSEE).

Founding of the philosophical institution «Athenaeum Hekatēvôlos,» where seminars are held regularly (philosophy, history, mythology, astrophysics, etc.)

Co-founding of the European Congress of Ethnic Religions (ECER, formerly WCER) by the YSEE.

21st CENTURY

Founding of the ethnic Hellenic religious community LABRYS.

Founding of the «Mythological Lab for Kids» under the patronage of YSEE. The «Mythological Lab for Kids» participates in the annual «Athens Science Festival» with its own projects, and can be understood as a Hellenic proto-school or «school of Hellenism.»

Founding of the seminar «Thymele: Theater pedagogy for Children» under the patronage of YSEE.

Founding of the «Courses in ancient Greek» (for adults) under the supervision of the sociologist and philosopher Ms. Ourania Toutountzi and under the patronage of YSEE.

Founding of YSEE Cyprus. The ethnic Hellens of Cyprus began the construction of a temple of Zeus on a private property outside the village of Lymbia, near Nicosia.

Founding of the Hellenic Council YSEE of America based in Astoria, New York.

Recognition of Hellenismos as a «known religion» under the name «Hellenic ethnic religion» in Greece. State recognition of YSEE’s cult premises in Athens as «The sanctuary of the Hellenic ethnic religion.»

Representation of Hellenismos at the 2018 Parliament of the World’s Religions in Toronto.